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Messages - Greg

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1
General Banter / Re: How many motorcycles is to many?
« on: December 09, 2018, 08:15:19 PM »
If garage space and bank account limits aren't an issue I would love:  a long distance BMW, a dirt bike, an early 70's Honda CB350, current model CBR1000rr, a vintage Vespa, a vintage Triumph, and yes even a Harley. 

2
General Banter / Re: Curious Thread
« on: November 15, 2018, 12:58:02 PM »
What are you guys talkin about?

You need to be on FB. The national MSTA group has their own "page".

3
General Banter / Curious Thread
« on: November 15, 2018, 07:16:35 AM »
Curious thread over at the national MSTA Facebook page of posting a picture of yourself and referencing your age. A person finally posted a counter thought on the trend, which has provoked a lively debate. I see both sides of the argument.

4
General Banter / Re: Various Ozark Bliss
« on: October 24, 2018, 09:42:27 AM »
More bliss.
Hwy 9 from Melbourne to Allison. Run it either direction. Do not make any mistakes on this one. Zero run off and very tight. Blink and you're dead.  ;)

http://www.motorcycleroads.com/75/31/Arkansas/The-Melbourne-Run.html

5
General Banter / Various Ozark Bliss
« on: October 24, 2018, 09:06:34 AM »

6
General Banter / Re: If
« on: October 19, 2018, 08:29:50 AM »
What prompted this discussion?
The continued lack of activity both in conversational postings as well as posted rides. 

7
General Banter / Re: If
« on: October 16, 2018, 07:17:31 AM »
Don't know, just a preemptive "heads-up" for everyone.
(Given how quiet things are)

8
General Banter / If
« on: October 16, 2018, 07:11:51 AM »
If this website falls off the face of the earth without warning, remember the parent MSTA can be found here.

http://www.ridemsta.com/mstaforums/index.php

9
General Banter / Very rare HWY 7 bliss
« on: September 18, 2018, 04:42:32 PM »
Using highway 7 from Jasper to Harrison is often troublesome. A great stretch of road, but almost always cluttered.  I often use it as either the first or last 20 miles of a route getting in or out if Harrison.
Well, today we had it almost all to ourselves and brand new pavement as well. Road Gods smiled on us today.




10
Off Topic / Re: Hello? Are you there?!
« on: September 08, 2018, 10:30:47 AM »
I 2nd a lot of Naustin's points. Over the last several years the participation level here at the forum has dropped significantly. Prior to last year there were several of us that scheduled "open" forum rides. As of this year only myself and one other person has done so. Part of that decline is due to the factors Nick mentioned, as well as people retiring, having kids, losing interest, etc ...
I do depart from Nick in the sense that although I have done a lot of solo riding, I prefer riding with like-minded riders.
Given motorcycling is inherently a personalized endeavor, peoples definitions of what a "group" ride is can differ greatly. A group ride could be 20 miles there and back at posted speeds to a lunch spot, it could be 350 miles of very spirited twisties following a route sheet with stops every 70-80 miles (my favorite), or anything in between.
One of the ways this organization has dealt with that difference of opinion about group rides is for the organizer to clarify up front what type of ride they like, as well as stressing every rider is responsible for his/her own choices.
Perhaps this is more information than you needed (lol), but I hope it helps some. And feel free to organize a ride!  ?

Greg

PS. More nonsense on this topic. http://mn-msta.com/index.php/topic,1967.0.html

PSS. Find us on FB too. More activity there.

11
General Banter / Re: Yep
« on: August 28, 2018, 02:24:43 PM »
"Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" is not about motorcycles, or about motorcycle maintenance, or about a road trip between a father and son -- though all three of those are described circumstantially.   It is an exploration of the metaphysics of Quality, where ever it can be found, whether in in experiences, endeavors, or relationships.

From Wikipedia:

"In an example of the classical approach, the narrator explains that one must pay continual attention: when the narrator and his friends came into Miles City, Montana[4] he notices that the "engine idle is loping a little", a possible indication that the fuel/air mixture is too rich. The next day he is thinking of this as he is going through his ritual to adjust the valves on his cycle's engine. During the adjustment, he notes that both spark plugs are black, confirming a rich mixture. He recognizes that the higher elevation is causing the engine to run rich. The narrator rectifies this by installing new jets.... and the engine runs well again."

"With this, the book details two types of personalities: those who are interested mostly in gestalts (romantic viewpoints focused on being "in the moment", and not on rational analysis), and those who seek to know details, understand inner workings.... (classic viewpoints with application of rational analysis, vis-a-vis motorcycle maintenance)."

"The narrator aims towards a perception of the world that embraces both sides, the rational and the romantic. This means encompassing "irrational" sources of wisdom and understanding as well as science, reason and technology. In particular, this must include bursts of creativity and intuition that seemingly come from nowhere and are not (in his view) rationally explicable. He seeks to demonstrate that rationality and Zen-like "being in the moment" can harmoniously coexist. He suggests such a combination of rationality and romanticism can potentially bring a higher quality of life."

"It has been noted that Pirsig's romantic/classical dichotomy resembles Nietzsche's Dionysian/Apollonian dichotomy as described in The Birth of Tragedy." 






He seeks to demonstrate that rationality and Zen-like "being in the moment" can harmoniously coexist. He suggests such a combination of rationality and romanticism can potentially bring a higher quality of life.

Yep. Be. Zen.
Eat sleep ride, repeat.
Very few things in life have had this effect on me like motorcycling has. This learning curve has also taught me how to focus on "BEing" in the moment in other areas of life as well. It's very spiritually freeing.

Anyway, that's my story and I'm sticking to it. :-p

12
General Banter / Re: Yep
« on: August 28, 2018, 06:48:27 AM »
"Empty head...............personally when I ride, my head is always full......... I am positive I would not ride if my head was empty, way too much information to soak in and make actions from"

Sorry to have to state the obvious :). I mean "empty" of other thoughts. Head is strictly focused on one task, riding. A common thread for decades among motorcyclists is this central point. The "zen" like experience of BEing in the moment, empty head of other thoughts, focusing on one task. Pretty sure there is even a very famous book explain this. https://www.amazon.com/Zen-Art-Motorcycle-Maintenance-Inquiry/dp/0060589469

13
General Banter / Re: Yep
« on: August 26, 2018, 08:56:46 PM »
no, just random musings.

14
General Banter / Yep
« on: August 25, 2018, 01:10:23 PM »
Go fast, curvy roads, empty head, fill soul, BE!


 

15
General Banter / Re: It's not my ride.
« on: August 18, 2018, 04:55:36 AM »
What do we do when we group ride.
Pace
Safe following distance
Ride your on ride.
You know.

Ahhh. Well, they were driving mostly in a straight line so the rules that apply to us don't to them I guess. They were pretty close to each other.

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